Past Event

The future of the External Investment Plan in the next MFF

What are the challenges for implementation of the new EIP?

Date: December 5, 2018, 12:30 pm Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance

The European Commission’s proposals for the MFF 2021-27 provide for a significant expansion and reconfiguration of the EU’s current external investment framework: the External Investment Plan (EIP). The proposals would see an increasing share of EU funds mobilized as blended finance and guarantees to support the operations of international finance institutions and private sector actors. Yet, the EIP was adopted in 2017 and has only just begun operation. As the Commission embarks on its scale-up, the questions are: to what extent is the current EIP delivering on its three objectives: resource mobilisation, improved effectiveness, enhanced coherence? What have been the key challenges to effectively implement the EIP? And how can these challenges be addressed under the new investment framework?

Mikaela Gavas, visiting fellow at CGD and Hannah Timmis, researcher at CGD, will present the findings of their analysis on the current EIP and propose options for achieving a more effective, streamlined and collaborative investment framework. Zsolt Darvas, our senior fellow, will moderate the round-table discussion on their findings.

This event is co-organised by Bruegel and Center for Global Development. It is invitation-only for Bruegel’s members and select experts, and will be held under Chatham House Rule.

Schedule

Dec 05, 2018

12:30-13:00

Check-in and lunch

13:00-13:10

Opening remarks

Zsolt Darvas, Senior Fellow

13:10-13:40

Presentation

Mikaela Gavas, Co-Director Development Cooperation in Europe and Senior Policy Fellow, CGD

Hannah Timmis, Research Assistant, Center for Global Development (CGD)

13:40-14:30

Round-table discussion

Chair: Zsolt Darvas, Senior Fellow

14:30

End

Speakers

Zsolt Darvas

Senior Fellow

Mikaela Gavas

Co-Director Development Cooperation in Europe and Senior Policy Fellow, CGD

Hannah Timmis

Research Assistant, Center for Global Development (CGD)

Location & Contact

Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels

Katja Knezevic

[email protected]

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