Past Event

From De-industrialization to the future of industries

Europe in the Global Economy

Date: Nov 28 - Topic: Global Economics & Governance

Deindustrialization is a major issue for all industrialized countries, in Europe and in America. This is also the case for Japan and Korea, two countries that have experienced an economic development based on the growth of manufacturing industries and that are particularly concerned by the rise of China in the international division of labor.

The purpose of this workshop is twofold. First, it revisits the link between deindustrialization and globalization, which is often blamed as a cause of deindustrialization, without much empirical evidence. Second, it investigates the emergence of new industries as a mean to stabilize the above trend or event to reverse it. The issues are then how to promote it and how governments can help the process.

The originality of this event is that papers that will be presented are dealing with German, French but also Japanese and Korean cases that are not well not known in Europe.

This event concludes a 3-year research program on the issues of industries coordinated by the Fondation France-Japon de EHESS (Ecole des hautes études en sciences sociales, Paris) that gave birth to various publications and debates.

Programme

Part I: Globalization and labor market outcomes: de-industrialization, job security, and wage inequalities

9:00 Welcome Address and general introduction by Guntram Wolff (Bruegel)

Chair: Guntram Wolff (Bruegel)

09:15 – 09:35 Sébastien Lechevalier (EHESS): Presentation of the special issue of Review of World Economics (Volume 151, issue 2, 2015), “Globalization and labor market outcomes: de-industrialization, job security, and wage inequalities”

9:35-9:55 Sébastien Miroudot (OECD): “Is Labor the fall guy of a financial-led globalization? Offshoring and its Relations to Wage-share, Employment and Skills in France, Germany, Korea and Japan since 1995” (joint with Cédric Durand (University Paris 13))

  • Discussant: Benedicta Marzinotto (Bruegel)

9:55 Discussion and Coffee Break

10:25-10:45 El Mouhoub Mouhoud (University Paris Dauphine): “Which are the risky jobs in the globalization? The French case” (joint with Catherine Laffineur (University Paris Dauphine))

  • Discussant: Cédric Durand (University Paris 13)

10:55-11:15 Ryo Kambayashi (Hitotsubashi University): “Expansion Abroad and Jobs at Home, Revisited” (joint with Kozo Kiyota (Keio University))

  • Discussant: Kazuyuki Motohashi (The University of Tokyo)

11:25-12:25 Policy panel “The impact of globalization on national labor markets. Policy implications and recommendations“

Participants: Cédric Durand (University Paris 13), Eliana Garces Tolon (Deputy Director of the EU Unit for Industrial Competitiveness),  Ryo Kambayashi (Hitotsubashi University), Sebastien Lechevalier (EHESS), Mouhoub El Mouhoud (University Paris Dauphine), Guntram Wolff (Bruegel)

12:25-13:30 Lunch

Part II: Emergence and evolution of new industries: from the analysis of industrial dynamics to a political economy approach

  • Chair: El Mouhoub Mouhoud (University Paris Dauphine)

13:30-13:50 Presentation of “The path¬dependent dynamics of emergence and evolution of new industries”, special section of Research Policy (Volume 43, Issue 10, 2014, co-edited by J. Krafft, S. Lechevalier, F. Quatraro & C. Storz) by Sébastien Lechevalier (EHESS)

  • Discussant: Reinhilde Veugelers (Bruegel)

13:50–14:10 Kazuyuki Motohashi

  • Discussant: Lionel Nesta (OFCE)

14:20-14:40 Rinaldo Evangelista (University of Camerino): “The impact of Business services on the economic performances of manufacturing industries“

  • Discussant: Antonio Andreoni (SOAS)

14.50 Coffee Break

15:20-15:40 Lionel Nesta (OFCE): “Competition and innovation: a new challenge for economic policy in the European Union“

  • Discussant: Kazuyuki Motohashi (The University of Tokyo)

15:50-17:00 Policy panel 2: “Emergence of new industries: what can industrial and innovation policies do?”

Participants: Antonio Andreoni (SOAS), Sebastien Lechevalier (EHESS), Kazuyuki Motohashi (The University of Tokyo), Lionel Nesta (OFCE), Reinhilde Veugelers (Bruegel)

17:00 Conclusion by Reinhilde Veugelers (Bruegel) and Sebastien Lechevalier

Practical details

The event is jointly organised by Bruegel and The Fondation France Japon de l’EHESS.

The Fondation France Japon de l’EHESS is beneficiating from the support of the following organizations for this event: Air Liquide, EDF, EHESS, The Japan Foundation

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