Past Event

AI regulation at the service of industrial policy?

What role should the EU play in the regulation of AI?

Date: April 22, 2021, 2:00 pm Topic: Innovation & Competition Policy

livestream and q&a

Bruegel · AI regulation at the service of industrial policy?

AI regulation could build trust in AI and thus speed up uptake by EU businesses—thus generating a demand for EU-compliant, EU-made AI. The European Commission, whose proposal for regulating AI will be published shortly before the event, insists that regulating AI would propel the EU into its (digital) industrial future. The event proposes to test this narrative.

Invited guests discussed the extent to which European firms are deterred from adopting or developing AI because of a lack of trust. And if a lack of trust is holding back businesses, might private labels or standards not best address the industrial coordination problem and consumer concerns? The speakers will assess the costs and benefits of regulating AI for the perspective of consumers and businesses but also citizens. Are there cases where the EU’s AI industrial ambition might conflict with its position on fundamental rights and consumer protection?

Presentation by Joanna Bryson

Presentation by Annika Linck

summary

The European Commission (EC) unveiled its proposal for regulating AI on April 21, 2020. Meeting the following day, the panellists discussed the economic rationale behind the proposal. According to the EC, regulation is necessary to increase trust in AI—so that more people, businesses, and public administrations come to adopt the technology and boost their productivity. This increased uptake would stimulate Europe’s AI business ecosystem. But at what price?

Martin Ulbrich opened the event by presenting the regulatory proposal as good for business. He explained that many companies have been calling for regulation—two-thirds say that lack of trust is slowing AI adoption. Furthermore, by focusing on a narrow set of high-risk AI, the EC minimised the administrative burden falling from the regulation.

Joanna Bryson argued that while regulating AI itself is impossible, regulating the people who use and develop it is essential. We don’t need to trust the AI. We need to trust the humans that build, train, test deploy, and monitor the technology.

Annika Linck presented the view of European digital SMEs. Surveyed in a focused group, 40% of digital SMEs viewed ethical and trustworthy AI as a boon to innovation. But she emphasised that important barriers to wider AI adoption remain in the EU, namely limited access to finance, data, and skilled personnel.

In the Q&A that followed, the panellists largely agreed that AI regulation was an opportunity for European businesses—not a threat to their global competitive advantage. Joanna Bryson welcomed the risk-based approach taken by the Commission; whereby riskier AI is more strictly regulated. Martin Ulbrich predicted that the requirements pertaining to high-risk AI would be relatively uncontroversial (e.g. around training data, human oversight, etc) and that the debate would focus on which AI should be classified as ‘high-risk’. Annika Linck envisaged the possible emergence of an ecosystem of ethical-AI providers in Europe.

Schedule

Apr 22, 2021

14:00-15:30 CET

Discussion

Chair: Julia Anderson, Research Analyst

Joanna Bryson, Professor of Ethics and Technology, Hertie School

Annika Linck, Senior EU Policy Manager, European Digital SME Alliance

Martin Ulbrich, Policy officer, European Commission, DG CONNECT

Speakers

Julia Anderson

Research Analyst

Joanna Bryson

Professor of Ethics and Technology, Hertie School

Annika Linck

Senior EU Policy Manager, European Digital SME Alliance

Martin Ulbrich

Policy officer, European Commission, DG CONNECT

Location & Contact

Katja Knezevic

[email protected]

Read about event More on this topic
 

Past Event

Past Event

Conference on the Future of Europe: Vehicle for reform versus forum for reflection?

At this policy dialogue organised by the research project EU3D, panellists will discuss different options and what they may entail while revisiting the debates on the future of Europe at national and EU-level that have been conducted thus far and their patterns, including preliminary findings on national parliamentary debates.

Speakers: Sergio Fabbrini, John Erik Fossum, Magdalena Góra, Vivien Schmidt, Manfred Weber and Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: June 16, 2021
Read about event More on this topic
 

Past Event

Past Event

The Recovery and Resilience Fund: Accelerating the digitalisation of the EU?

How can new EU funds financed by EU borrowing supplement national digital and green funding and EU funds available from the standard seven-year EU budget to accelerate digitalisation?

Speakers: Sam Blackie, Zsolt Darvas, Maria Teresa Fabregas Fernandez, J. Scott Marcus and Ben Wreschner Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: June 8, 2021
Read about event More on this topic
 

Past Event

Past Event

Women, Covid-19 & The EU Recovery Plan

How can we ensure that the recovery plan doesn’t leave women behind when 84% of working women in the EU aged 15-64 are employed by services that were predominantly impacted by Covid-19 restrictions?

Speakers: Mary Collins, Maria Demertzis, Alexandra Geese, Jacob Funk Kirkegaard, Dan Mobley, Naomi O'Leary and Emma Rainey Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: June 2, 2021
Read article Download PDF
 

External Publication

European Parliament

Digital European Economic Sovereignty? The Case of Semiconductors

Study prepared for the European Parliament's Committee on Foreign Affairs (AFET).

By: Niclas Poitiers, Pauline Weil and Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance, European Parliament, Innovation & Competition Policy Date: May 28, 2021
Read about event More on this topic
 

Past Event

Past Event

Paris Reinforce: From Numbers to Insights: How to think about economic-climate modelling

Join us for the presentation of ‘From Numbers to Insights: How to think about economic-climate modelling’.

Speakers: Haris Doukas, Ajay Gambhir, Glen Peters, Georg Zachmann and Ewelina Daniel Topic: Energy & Climate Date: May 26, 2021
Read about event More on this topic
 

Past Event

Past Event

The work of the future: How are new jobs created and what are the implications for labour markets?

Join us for a presentation of 'New Frontiers: The Origins and Content of New Work, 1940 — 2018' by David Autor (MIT and NBER) and the findings on the source of 'new work' followed by a discussion with an invited panel of academics and policy makers.

Speakers: David Autor, Maarten Goos, Barbara Kauffmann and Georgios Petropoulos Topic: Innovation & Competition Policy Date: May 25, 2021
Read about event
 

Past Event

Past Event

The Future of Work – a conversation with Commissioner Schmit

EU Commissioner for Jobs and Social Rights Nicolas Schmit joins Bruegel for a conversation around the future of work.

Speakers: Mario Mariniello and Nicolas Schmit Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance, Innovation & Competition Policy Date: May 25, 2021
Read about event More on this topic
 

Past Event

Past Event

After COVID-19: a most wanted recovery

This event, jointly organised with ISPI, as the National Coordinator and Chair of the T20 Italy, is part of the T20 Spring Roundtables and it will focus on strategies for a swift and sustainable economic recovery for Europe.

Speakers: Franco Bruni, Maria Demertzis, Elena Flores, Paul De Grauwe, Christian Odendahl, Miguel Otero-Iglesias and André Sapir Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: May 19, 2021
Read about event More on this topic
 

Past Event

Past Event

Global value chain reshuffling: From tight coupling to loose coupling?

As the focus shifts from efficiency to resilience in global supply chains, what does this mean for China?

Speakers: Erik Berglöf, Alicia García-Herrero, Niclas Poitiers and Kristy Tsun-Tzu Hsu Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: May 11, 2021
Read article Download PDF More on this topic More by this author
 

Working Paper

Research and innovation policies and productivity growth

Can research and innovation policies power growth? The answer currently can only be a timid yes. Too little is known of what drives the actual effects of R&I policies.

By: Reinhilde Veugelers Topic: Innovation & Competition Policy Date: May 10, 2021
Read article More on this topic More by this author
 

Opinion

Europe's crusade to fend off Chinese interference falls short

It is in everybody's interest for China to level the playing field among state-owned, private, and foreign companies so that no new distortionary measures need to be taken elsewhere.

By: Alicia García-Herrero Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: May 10, 2021
Read article More on this topic More by this author
 

Blog Post

Algorithmic management is the past, not the future of work

Algorithmic management is the twenty-first century’s scientific management. Job quality measures should be included explicitly in health and safety risk assessments for workplace artificial-intelligence systems.

By: Laura Nurski Topic: Innovation & Competition Policy Date: May 6, 2021
Load more posts