Partnerships

Future of work and inclusive growth

 

The project Future of Work and Inclusive Growth in Europe was launched on 2 Sept 2020 in the Bruegel Annual Meetings. It is supported by and developed in collaboration with the Mastercard Center for Inclusive Growth. The project, envisioned over the last three years, closely analyses the impact of technology on the nature, quantity and quality of work, welfare systems and inclusive growth at large. That includes exploring the role of technology and AI in reshaping society, particularly when subject to extreme stress (e.g. during a pandemic), and considering those who have been most affected by these forces in the short and long term.

Goals and objectives

Technological development, and in particular, digitalisation, has major implications for labour markets and the nature of work itself. There is a rise in alternative types of work that today’s European welfare states have not yet had the chance to adapt to. The transformation of the way we work is only likely to speed up because of the pandemic. While there is still uncertainty surrounding the long-term economic implications of the pandemic, we know that Europe’s digital future, and its relationship with its workforce in particular, will be wholly impacted, and it will require an inclusive, cross-sector response moving forward. The project aims at creating a research-to-action network which will bring together academics, policymakers, practitioners, and the private sector to bridge new insights on critical issues with opportunities for practical application.

outcomes

The project will address and study AI and its distributional effects, “gig” economy, technological advancement, SMEs and the workplace, return on education and human capital investment, welfare systems and other related aspects. The anticipated outcomes of the three-year-long project include:

  • A platform for a diverse community of stakeholders (academia, business sector, employers’ organizations, employees organisations and trade unions, government bodies, experts, etc.) to allow exchange of insights and enhance a stronger collaboration between different social and economic actors.
  • Case studies and surveys in selected EU countries on adoption of technologies in different sectors and how it impacts workers.
  • Events in Brussels and other EU countries to share and discuss the findings of the research with strategic stakeholders across Europe.
  • Policy reports and papers.
  • Dissemination of results through social media, data visualizations, podcasts and other Bruegel’s output.

a key PARTNERSHIP

As a leading independent voice in Europe on economic policy response, with a track record of extensive work around the role of digitization, technology, and gig work in the labour force, Bruegel is well positioned to lead this effort. Bruegel has been successfully collaborating with the Mastercard Center for Inclusive Growth in the past three years conducting studies on inclusive growth (2016)migration (2017) and the effects of digitalisation on European welfare states (2018/19).  The Center, committed to support initiatives that focus on long-term economic growth and the reduction of income and information inequality, is the ideal catalyser for this initiative. In addition, Bruegel’s Director Guntram Wolff has been a Fellow of the Mastercard Global Economic Panel since 2013. The economic panel meets 1-2 times per year with the senior MasterCard management to discuss the global economy in an informal way, which led to building a strong relationship between Bruegel and the Center.

PEOPLE

Mario Mariniello, Senior fellow and Project leader

Guntram Wolff, Director of Bruegel

BLOGS & PUBLICATIONS

COVID-19 could leave another generation of young people on the scrapheap, opinion by Guntram Wolff.

Job polarisation and the Great Recession, Blog post by Sybrand Brekelmans and Georgios Petropoulos. 

Artificial intelligence’s great impact on low and middle-skilled jobs, Blog post by Sybrand Brekelmans and Georgios Petropoulos. 

 

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