technology

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Opinion

Central bank currencies going digital

Electronic cash might be the future, but it is still unclear what payment innovation it offers for the public, certainly in the euro area. And it is unlikely to fully replace the comfort the consumer feels in having money under the mattress.

By: Maria Demertzis Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation, Global Economics & Governance Date: April 27, 2021
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Blog Post

Job polarisation and the Great Recession

A job polarisation trend has seen relatively more workers in the European Union employed in skilled and unskilled jobs, while mid-skilled jobs have been squeezed. Since the Great Recession, the supply of university graduates has risen, but the labour market’s demand for skills has not kept up. Graduates have, however, fared better than less-educated workers in terms of wages.

By: Sybrand Brekelmans and Georgios Petropoulos Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: November 3, 2020
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Past Event

Past Event

An alternative mobile operating environment?

Walking the wire: we discuss risks and benefits involved for the EU should it embark on developing a new smartphone operating system.

Speakers: Hosuk Lee-Makiyama, J. Scott Marcus, Renato Nazzini, Peter Stuckmann and Andreas Zimmer Topic: Innovation & Competition Policy Date: April 29, 2020
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Opinion

Could the U.S. economy be experiencing a hidden tech-driven productivity revolution?

In the last decade, most advanced economies have grown more slowly than before. Slower growth has frequently been seen as a legacy of financial crises, especially that of 2007–2009.

By: Marek Dabrowski Topic: Innovation & Competition Policy Date: January 6, 2020
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Podcast

Podcast

Capture the nodes

How do states exercise power through global economic networks? The multilateral world order is supposed to be harmonious, but by seizing the nodes of production, powerful forces can control access to the global economic system and threaten to lock their rival out. This week, Nicholas Barrett and Guntram Wolff are joined by Henry Farrell, Professor of political science and international affairs at the George Washington University, and Abraham L. Newman, Professor of Government at the Georgetown University, to discuss their theory of weaponised interdependency

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: December 16, 2019
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Policy Contribution

Bridging the divide: new evidence about firms and digitalisation

Small European firms are falling behind in the race to digitalise, but so are their American counterparts.

By: Reinhilde Veugelers and Bruegel Topic: Innovation & Competition Policy Date: December 11, 2019
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Blog Post

Work Protection in the Digital Age: Towards a new social contract

Over the past few years, new business models have emerged, empowered by digital technologies. These have disrupted a range of activities, from food delivery and transportation to accommodation and venture capital. Digital companies and their new business models collectively make up the so-called platform or collaborative economy. New forms of work have been created posing the question: How can the social contract catch up?

By: Georgios Petropoulos and Bruegel Topic: Innovation & Competition Policy Date: November 4, 2019
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Blog Post

Questions to the Competition Commissioner-designate

Commissioner Vestager has been given two portfolios; Executive Vice-President for a Europe fit for the Digital Age and Competition Commissioner. While having more than one portfolio may not be new, combining an important policy coordination function and an enforcement function is a novel approach. This raises a number of important questions related to how the objectives of either portfolio can be delivered cleanly.

By: Mathew Heim Topic: Innovation & Competition Policy Date: September 27, 2019
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Blog Post

Jobs and robots: Europe’s Debate Over the Destiny of the Welfare State

This blog is part of a series following the 2019 Bruegel annual meetings, which brought together nearly 1,000 participants for two days of policy debate and discussion.

By: J. Scott Marcus, Giuseppe Porcaro and Bruegel Topic: Innovation & Competition Policy Date: September 20, 2019
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Podcast

Podcast

Backstage at BAM19: How can Europe's economy thrive in the digital age?

Backstage at the Bruegel Annual Meetings, Giuseppe Porcaro talks with session chair Reinhilde Veugelers on Europe's economy in the digital age.

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: Innovation & Competition Policy Date: September 4, 2019
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Blueprint

Digitalisation and European welfare states

EU policymakers must find answers to pressing questions: if technology has a negative impact on labour income, how will the welfare state be funded? How can workers’ welfare rights be adequately secured? A team of Bruegel scholars, with the support of the Mastercard Center for Inclusive Growth, has taken on these questions.

By: Georgios Petropoulos, J. Scott Marcus, Nicolas Moës and Enrico Bergamini Topic: Innovation & Competition Policy Date: July 9, 2019
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Blog Post

Breaking up big companies and market power concentration

Senator Elizabeth Warren proposes the break-up of big tech companies. A report for the UK government presents another approach for regulating the digital economy. And IMF research serves as a reminder that concentration of market power extends beyond digital. This blog reviews the debate.

By: Konstantinos Efstathiou and Bruegel Topic: Innovation & Competition Policy Date: April 29, 2019
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