South Korea

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Opinion

Europe doesn’t need a ‘Mega-Fab’

Europe should defend its existing dominance in equipment manufacturing for semiconductors and invest in chip design instead of luring high-end fabrication to its shores.

By: Niclas Poitiers Topic: Global economy and trade Date: September 22, 2021
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Opinion

A silver lining for ageing Asia

An ageing population is generally bad news for growth prospects, but Japan and Taiwan offer important lessons.

By: Alicia García-Herrero Topic: Global economy and trade Date: December 8, 2020
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Podcast

Podcast

Sizing up the world's largest trade deal

What should be Europe's strategy towards the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP)?

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: Global economy and trade Date: November 18, 2020
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Opinion

South Korea needs to watch the BOJ rather than the Fed

Due its actual economic structure, South Korea should be more worried about BOJ's extremely lax stance than about monetary policy normalization by the Fed.

By: Alicia García-Herrero and Bruegel Topic: Banking and capital markets, Global economy and trade Date: December 14, 2017
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Opinion

South Korea and Indonesia: a capital match

Mutually beneficial Jakarta-Seoul relationship could develop further with an upgrade in Jakarta’s sovereign debt.

By: Alicia García-Herrero and Bruegel Topic: Banking and capital markets, Global economy and trade Date: November 23, 2016
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Blog Post

Competition policy trends in South Korea

Economists often talk about a strong correlation between market development and enforcement of competition policy rules. That is not surprising: competition policy aims at removing obstacles to economic activity, such as barriers to market entry, and it encourages new businesses to challenge incumbent players’ market power. Economic theory suggests that this dynamic brings about an increase in total production. It also suggests that the pressure from competition can trigger a ‘Darwinian selection’, so that firms are forced to be as efficient as possible if they want to survive in the market. This generally means lower production costs, higher quality and lower prices paid by consumers. Conversely, in specific circumstances, excessive competitive pressure may reduce incentives to invest (reducing profit expectations); and therefore, slow down the growth pace.

By: Mario Mariniello and Marco Antonielli Topic: Digital economy and innovation, Global economy and trade Date: February 21, 2013