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The Sound of Economics Live: China’s economy after COVID-19

This episode of The Sound of Economics Live will explore the short and medium term prospects for the Chinese economy after COVID-19

Date: May 6, 2020, 11:00 am Topic: Global Economics & Governance

Livestream at 11:00 CET

Ask questions during the event through sli.do using #China.

In this live recording of an episode of the Sound of Economics Live we invite Alicia Garcia Herrero and Yiping Huang into our virtual studio to discuss the outlook for the Chinese economy after the COVID-19 crisis.

How hard has the Chinese economy been hit by COVID-19. How much is the government ready to do to stimulate the economy and how? Will the government’s stimulus work?
What are the short-term and medium-term prospects for China?

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This event is online only

You will be able to access the livestream on this page, TwitterYoutube, and Facebook without any registration.

Schedule

May 06, 2020

11:00-12:00

Conversation

Alicia García-Herrero, Senior Fellow, Bruegel

Giuseppe Porcaro, Head of Outreach and Governance

Yiping Huang, Jin Guang Chair Professor of Economics and Finance and Deputy Dean, National School of Development (NSD) and Director, Institute of Digital Finance (IDF), Peking University

Q&A through Sli.do

Speakers

Alicia García-Herrero

Senior Fellow, Bruegel

Yiping Huang

Jin Guang Chair Professor of Economics and Finance and Deputy Dean, National School of Development (NSD) and Director, Institute of Digital Finance (IDF), Peking University

Giuseppe Porcaro

Head of Outreach and Governance

Location & Contact

Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels

Matilda Sevon

[email protected]

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