Past Event

The Sound of Economics Live: An analysis of the German Constitutional Court ruling on the ECB QE programme

What does today's ruling of the German Constitutional Court mean for the ECB's Quantitative Easing programmme

Date: May 5, 2020, 3:15 pm Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance

Livestream at 15:15

Ask questions during the event through sli.do using # QERULING

In its judgment pronounced today, the Second Senate of the German Federal Constitutional Court granted several constitutional complaints directed against the Public Sector Purchase Programme (PSPP) of the European Central Bank (ECB).

For this live session of the Sound of Economics Giuseppe Porcaro is joined by Guntram Wolff, director of Bruegel, and Franz Mayer, professor of Law at the University of Bielefeld, to analyse the ruling of the court and its consequences.

This event is online only

You will be able to access the livestream on this page, TwitterYoutube, and Facebook without any registration.

Schedule

May 05, 2020

15:15-16:00

Conversation

Franz Mayer, Chair of Public Law, University of Bielefeld

Giuseppe Porcaro, Head of Outreach and Governance

Guntram B. Wolff, Director

Speakers

Franz Mayer

Chair of Public Law, University of Bielefeld

Giuseppe Porcaro

Head of Outreach and Governance

Guntram B. Wolff

Director

Location & Contact

Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels

Matilda Sevon

[email protected]

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