Past Event

The resurrection of the European Banking Union

At this event, Luis Garicano, member of the European Parliament, presented his two proposals to resurrect the European Banking Union: "a Safe Portfolio" and "a Single Resolution Board +".

Date: February 20, 2020, 12:30 pm Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation

Video and audio recordings

Event Summary

After 8 years, the European Banking Union has not achieved its two stated objectives: breaking future contagion between banks and sovereigns, and creating a true single market for banks.

The aim of this event was to discuss possible solutions to revive the Banking Union. More specifically, Luis Garicano argued in his presentation for the empowerment of the Single Resolution Board and the creation of a “Safe Portfolio” model.

Following these proposed solutions, the political and economic feasibility was discussed in a panel, together with other possible ways to resurrect the Banking Union.

More information about the recommendations can be found here:

Two proposals to resurrect the Banking Union by Luis Garicano.

 

Schedule

Feb 20, 2020

12:30-13:00

Check-in and networking lunch

13:00-13:30

Presentation by Luis Garicano

13:30-14:15

Panel Discussion

Chair: Guntram B. Wolff, Director, Bruegel

Tom Dechaene, Board member, National Bank of Belgium

Luis Garicano, Vice-President of the Renew Europe

Michala Marcussen, Global Head of Economics, Société Générale, Corporate and Investment Banking

14:15-14:30

Q&A

14:30

End

Speakers

Tom Dechaene

Board member, National Bank of Belgium

Luis Garicano

Vice-President of the Renew Europe

Michala Marcussen

Global Head of Economics, Société Générale, Corporate and Investment Banking

Guntram B. Wolff

Director, Bruegel

Location & Contact

Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels

Katja Knezevic

[email protected]

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