Past Event

The Sound of Economics Live – The Brussels effect: How the European Union rules the world

This was a live recording of an episode of the Sound of Economics, Bruegel's podcast series. The discussion centered around the book of Anu Bradford, The Brussels Effect.

Date: March 3, 2020, 12:30 pm Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance

At this event, we recorded an episode of the Sound of Economics, Bruegel’s podcast series. The host and guests discussed Anu Bradford’s book: “The Brussels Effect: How the European Union rules the world”.

Anu Bradford argues in her book that the European Union has a significant amount of power on a global level. The EU shows this power in different policy areas such as data privacy, consumer safety, environmental protection and competition rules. In this book, Ms. Bradford looks at the implications for the UK after Brexit. She argues that regardless of the nature of the relationship after Brexit, the UK will not be able to escape the EU’s regulatory reach.

Video and podcast

 

Schedule

Mar 3, 2020

12:30-13:00

Check-in and networking lunch

13:00-14:00

Recording of "The Sound of Economics: The Brussels Effect"

Chair: Giuseppe Porcaro, Head of Outreach and Governance

Anu Bradford, Professor of Law and International Organization, Columbia University

Ashoka Mody, Charles and Marie Robertson Visiting Professor in International Economic Policy at the Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University

Guntram B. Wolff, Director, Bruegel

14:00

End

Speakers

Anu Bradford

Professor of Law and International Organization, Columbia University

Ashoka Mody

Charles and Marie Robertson Visiting Professor in International Economic Policy at the Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University

Giuseppe Porcaro

Head of Outreach and Governance

Guntram B. Wolff

Director, Bruegel

Location & Contact

Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels

Matilda Sevon

[email protected]

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Past Event

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Podcast

Podcast

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Past Event

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Podcast

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