Past Event

Recovery and Resolution Planning for Europe’s cross-border banks

This workshop will discuss recovery and resolution plans in the CEE countries

Date: December 6, 2019, 12:30 pm Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation

As a new European framework for the management of banking crises is taking shape this Bruegel workshop will examine the recovery and resolution plans of European banks active in emerging Europe.

The workshop will be designed to facilitate in-depth discussion of financial and operational arrangements in key cross-border banking groups, and the coordination between euro area authorities, and key host countries.

This event is only open to members and selected invitees. For more information contact [email protected]

Background reading

Crisis management for euro-area banks in central Europe by Alexander Lehmann

Schedule

Dec 06, 2019

12:30-13:00

Check-in and lunch

13:00-13:50

KEY CHALLENGES IN CROSS-BORDER RESOLUTION PLANNING IN THE CEE REGION

Chair: Guntram B. Wolff, Director

Opening remarks

Boris Vujčić, Governor, Croatian National Bank

Alexander Benkwitz, Head of Resolution Division, Austrian National Bank

Sebastiano Laviola, Board Member, Single Resolution Board

13:50-14:40

THE BANK’S RECOVERY PLANNING AND RESOLVABILITY

Roland Mechtler, Head of Group Regulatory Affairs & Data Governance, Raiffeisen Bank International

Sofia Toscano Rico, Head of Crisis Management Division, ECB

Dejan Vasiljev, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD)

14:40-15:30

DIRECTIONS IN HOST COUNTRY RESOLUTION PLANNING

“Crisis management for euro-area banks in central Europe”

Alexander Lehmann, Non-resident fellow

Krzysztof Broda, Deputy President, Polish Bank Guarantee Fund

Radek Urban, Executive Director Resolution Department, Czech National Bank

Emil Vonvea, Director Bank Resolution, National Bank of Romania

15:45

End

Speakers

Sebastiano Laviola

Board Member, Single Resolution Board

Alexander Lehmann

Non-resident fellow

Boris Vujčić

Governor, Croatian National Bank

Alexander Benkwitz

Head of Resolution Division, Austrian National Bank

Roland Mechtler

Head of Group Regulatory Affairs & Data Governance, Raiffeisen Bank International

Sofia Toscano Rico

Head of Crisis Management Division, ECB

Krzysztof Broda

Deputy President, Polish Bank Guarantee Fund

Radek Urban

Executive Director Resolution Department, Czech National Bank

Dejan Vasiljev

European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD)

Emil Vonvea

Director Bank Resolution, National Bank of Romania

Guntram B. Wolff

Director

Location & Contact

Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels

Matilda Sevon

[email protected]

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