Scholars

Simone Tagliapietra

Senior Fellow

Expertise: Energy Markets, Energy and Climate Policy, Neighborhood Policy CV: Download CV Twitter: @Tagliapietra_S

Simone Tagliapietra is a Senior fellow at Bruegel. He is also Adjunct professor of Energy, Climate and Environmental Policy at the Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore and at The Johns Hopkins University - School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) Europe.

His research focuses on the European Union climate and energy policy and on the political economy of global decarbonisation. With a record of numerous policy and scientific publications, he is the author of Global Energy Fundamentals (Cambridge University Press, 2020), L’Energia del Mondo (Il Mulino, 2020) and Energy Relations in the Euro-Mediterranean (Palgrave, 2017).

His columns and policy work are published and cited in leading international media such as the Financial Times, The New York Times, The Guardian, The Wall Street Journal, Le Monde, Die Zeit, Corriere della Sera, Il Sole 24 Ore and others.

Simone holds a PhD in Institutions and Policies from Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore. Born in the Dolomites in 1988, he speaks Italian, English and French.

Declaration of interests 2020

Declaration of interests 2019

Declaration of interests 2018

Declaration of interests 2017

Declaration of interests 2016

Contact information

[email protected]

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Blog Post

Setting Europe’s economic recovery in motion: a first look at national plans

Plans for spending European Union recovery funds submitted by the four largest EU countries reflect rather different priorities. So far, only Italy is interested in borrowing from the EU.

By: Zsolt Darvas and Simone Tagliapietra Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: April 29, 2021
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Blog Post

China has a grand carbon neutrality target but where is the plan?

China’s new long-term targets, to reach peak emissions before 2030 and achieve carbon neutrality by 2060, are yet to be matched with a consistent short-term action plan.

By: Alicia García-Herrero and Simone Tagliapietra Topic: Energy & Climate Date: April 14, 2021
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Opinion

It’s time for a green social contract

The green transformation will have far-reaching socio-economic implications. Action is needed to ensure domestic and international social equity and fairness.

By: Simone Tagliapietra Topic: Energy & Climate Date: April 12, 2021
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Opinion

Letter: ‘Strategic autonomy’ is now an EU catchphrase

Strategic autonomy should not be an illusionary search for independence, but rather a strategic management of interdependence, based on diversification of supply chains.

By: Simone Tagliapietra Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: March 24, 2021
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External Publication

Form a climate club: United States, European Union and China

If the three biggest economies agree a carbon tax on imports, it will catalyse climate action globally.

By: Guntram B. Wolff and Simone Tagliapietra Topic: Energy & Climate Date: March 23, 2021
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Opinion

The EU can’t separate climate policy from foreign policy

How to make the European Green Deal succeed.

By: Mark Leonard, Jean Pisani-Ferry, Jeremy Shapiro, Simone Tagliapietra and Guntram B. Wolff Topic: Energy & Climate, Global Economics & Governance Date: March 5, 2021
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Blog Post

Carbon price floors: an addition to the European Green Deal arsenal

As the European Union sets out a more ambitious climate policy, carbon price floors provide an opportunity to place greater emphasis on altering expectations, so that market agents anticipate today higher future pay-offs from low-carbon investment.

By: Maria Demertzis and Simone Tagliapietra Topic: Energy & Climate Date: March 3, 2021
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Blog Post

Carbon border adjustment in the United States: not easy, but not impossible either

President Biden has promised to implement a levy on carbon-intensive imports, albeit without a federal domestic carbon price. The measure faces a number of difficulties, but could feasibly be implemented. The route chosen by the US will have important implications for the EU's own plans.

By: Ben McWilliams and Simone Tagliapietra Topic: Energy & Climate Date: February 11, 2021
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