Scholars

Martin Kahanec

Mercator Senior Visiting Fellow

Expertise: labor and population economics, migration, EU mobility Twitter: @@MartinKahanec

Mercator Senior Visiting Fellow at Bruegel, Brussels. Professor and former Acting Dean (2017-2019) of the School of Public Policy at the Central European University in Budapest. Founder and Scientific Director of CELSI. Affiliated Scholar at the Global Labor Organization; Centre for Population, Development and Labour Economics (POP), MERIT, United Nations University, Maastricht; and University of Economics in Bratislava. Visiting Research Fellow and former Deputy Program Director "Migration", leader of the research sub-area EU Enlargement and the Labor Markets and Deputy Director of Research (2009) at the Institute of Labor Economics (IZA) in Bonn, Germany. Visiting Research Fellow at Harvard University's Labor and Worklife Program 2014/15.

Former chairperson of the Slovak Economic Association (2016-2018). An elected member of Academia Europaea, the European Academy of Humanities, Letters and Sciences.

His main research interests are labor and population economics, migration, EU mobility, ethnicity, and reforms in European labor markets. Martin Kahanec has published in peer-reviewed academic journals, contributed chapters in collected volumes including the Oxford Handbook of Economic Inequality (OxfordUP) and the International Handbook on the Economics of Migration (Edward Elgar), and he has edited several scientific book volumes and journal special issues.

Associate Editor of the International Journal of Manpower; Editorial Board member of the Journal of European Social Policy; founding Managing Editor of the IZA Journal of European Labor Studies (2012-2016), included in Scopus under his leadership; and former member of the Editorial Board of Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research.

Martin Kahanec has held several advisory positions and leading roles in a number of scientific and policy projects with the World Bank, the European Commission, European Parliament, European Court of Auditors, OECD, and other international and national institutions.

Martin Kahanec earned his Ph.D. in Economics in 2006 from the Center for Economic Research (CentER), Tilburg University, the Netherlands.

Contact information

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Blog Post

The impact of COVID-19 restrictions on individual mobility

Distancing measures imposed by twelve European countries during the COVID-19 pandemics (a ban on holding public events, school closures, shop closures, and a ban on non-essential movement) were associated with large drops in visits to retail and recreation, groceries and pharmacies, transit stations, and workplaces, drops in visits to parks in most cases, and an increase in time spent at home. These effects, measured and disentangled in our analysis, have implications for the costs and risks of closing and re-opening economies: distancing policies (i) reduced contact and likely reduced the transmission of COVID-19 within the population, implying gains for public health, while they (ii) reduced presence at workplaces, shops, restaurants and other venues of economic activity, implying economic costs.

By: Martin Kahanec, Lukáš Lafférs and J. Scott Marcus Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: May 5, 2020