Research assistants & interns

Marta Domínguez-Jiménez

Research Analyst

Twitter: @MartaDomnguezJ1

Marta works at Bruegel as a Research Analyst. She holds a BA in Economics and Management from the University of Oxford, where she specialised in International Macroeconomics and Emerging Economies. She also has an MA in European Political and Governance Studies from the College of Europe in Bruges.

Before joining Bruegel, Marta worked as an Analyst within the Markets division of Citigroup in London. She focused on the structuring of bespoke fixed income products, with both European and emerging market rates as their core, from the initial research and conceptual development of possible structures to ex-post monitoring and potential subsequent restructuring. She also worked on the design and development of structured but systemic strategies that seek to obtain returns from small structural imperfections within the markets, identifying these as well as the best method for exposure.

Marta was also a trainee at the Permanent Representation of Spain to the EU, in the Office of Parliamentary Affairs, where she monitored the activity of the European Parliament and prepared detailed reports on debates regarding the Economic governance of the EU, as well as those that tackled contingency planning for Brexit (both at the Plenary level and in the ECON Committee). She was also an assistant to the Spanish Diplomatic Counselor in COREPER, presenting briefings prior to the meetings to assist the diplomat in charge of intervening in the debates and helping to define the Spanish position.

Marta was also team leader and spokesperson in a public policy consulting project for the City Council of Stavanger with the European Centre for Government Transformation.

Marta is fluent in Spanish and English, and proficient in German and French.

Contact information

[email protected]

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Policy Contribution

Economic Crisis in the Middle East and North Africa

In the 2010s, the economic outlook of the countries in the Middle East and North Africa region deteriorated, with numerous long-term socio-economic and institutional challenges still unresolved. COVID-19 has compounded the problems. As the region's largest external trading partner, the European Union should do more to support economic and political transformation.

By: Marek Dabrowski and Marta Domínguez-Jiménez Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: January 21, 2021
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Parliamentary Testimony

European Parliament

Monetary Policy in the times of corona: many unknown unknowns

Testimony to the European Parliament on monetary policy.

By: Maria Demertzis and Marta Domínguez-Jiménez Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance, European Parliament, Testimonies Date: December 21, 2020
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External Publication

European Parliament

Monetary policy in the time of COVID-19, or how uncertainty is here to stay

The COVID-19 crisis has compounded the uncertainty that has come to characterise the European economy. We explore how this uncertainty manifests itself in terms of ECB decision-making and the long-run challenges the ECB faces.

By: Maria Demertzis and Marta Domínguez-Jiménez Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance, European Parliament, Testimonies Date: November 12, 2020
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External Publication

How Can the European Parliament Better Oversee the European Central Bank?

This paper, written at the request of the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs, assesses how the European Parliament holds the European Central Bank accountable. The same exercise is done for the Bank of Japan, in order to identify possible lessons for the ECB and the European Parliament.

By: Grégory Claeys and Marta Domínguez-Jiménez Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance, Global Economics & Governance Date: September 23, 2020
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Blog Post

Emerging market central banks and quantitative easing: high-risk advice

Central banks in emerging markets with weak currencies should not resort to unorthodox monetary tools such as quantitative easing as a response to the crisis triggered by COVID-19. Preferable alternatives include shifting public spending away from less pressing needs, moderately increasing public debt and falling back on official development assistance.

By: Marek Dabrowski and Marta Domínguez-Jiménez Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: August 26, 2020
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Opinion

Can households in the European Union make ends meet?

Half the households surveyed by Eurostat see themselves as unable to find the resources they would need to cope with an unexpected expense within a month, estimated by experts at €375 in the case of Greece.

By: Maria Demertzis, Marta Domínguez-Jiménez, Annamaria Lusardi and Bruegel Topic: Finance & Financial Regulation Date: July 24, 2020
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Blog Post

Ukraine: trade reorientation from Russia to the EU

Over the past five years conflict has led to a deterioration of Russo-Ukrainian economic relations while ties with the EU have been deepened. This shift is evident in trade flows: the European Union has become Ukraine’s biggest trading partner, while China is poised to overtake Russia as its second. Natural gas imports from Russia, Ukraine’s prior Achilles heel, have been partially replaced by reverse deliveries from the EU and reduced as result of reform of the gas sector.

By: Marek Dabrowski, Marta Domínguez-Jiménez and Georg Zachmann Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: July 13, 2020
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Blog Post

Europe’s China problem: investment screening and state aid

China’s state capitalist economy poses a challenge to EU openness to foreign investment. In response, the European Commission 17 June published a White Paper on “levelling the playing field with regard to state aid”, contemplating sensible and balanced policies to protect the integrity of the European single market from subsidised foreign acquisitions. However, against the backdrop of collapsing global capital flows and limited existing FDI from China, there is little risk of excessive exposure, indeed a deepening of bilateral investment flows would be beneficial for both economies.

By: Marta Domínguez-Jiménez, Niclas Poitiers and Bruegel Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: July 2, 2020
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Policy Contribution

The financial fragility of European households in the time of COVID-19

The concept of household financial fragility emerged in the United States after the 2007-2008 financial crisis. It grew out of the need to understand whether households’ lack of capacity to face shocks could itself become a source of financial instability.

By: Maria Demertzis, Marta Domínguez-Jiménez, Annamaria Lusardi and Bruegel Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: July 2, 2020
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Policy Contribution

Six years after Ukraine’s Euromaidan: reforms and challenges ahead

Since the Euromaidan protests (2013-2014), Ukraine has had two presidents and four governments. In a difficult environment of external aggression, they have initiated various reforms aimed at bringing the country closer to the European Union and boosting growth. Progress has been partial and relies on international backing, with limited domestic appetite for reform.

By: Marek Dabrowski, Marta Domínguez-Jiménez and Georg Zachmann Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: June 30, 2020
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Blog Post

Is COVID-19 triggering a new emerging-market crisis?

Emerging economies have received little attention in the economic debate regarding the COVID-19 pandemic, yet the performance of their primary market indicators, chiefly sovereign debt, foreign exchange and equities, indicate a deep deterioration is taking place. Times of crisis often lead to capital flight from emerging markets as investors seek safe haven assets, while the localised effects of the disease and the collapse in the price of certain key commodities have also been damaging. More worryingly, this appears to be the beginning of the storm, and emerging economies have far less room for fiscal and monetary manoeuvring.

By: Marek Dabrowski and Marta Domínguez-Jiménez Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: March 30, 2020
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Blog Post

COVID-19 and broken Collusion: the oil price collapse is one more warning for Russia

In the midst of the COVID-19 epidemic, the sharp collapse in the oil price has received little attention. Brent fell by 30% on 9 March, the largest fall since the 1991 Gulf War. The Russian ruble followed suit and its tumble highlights Russia’s continued dependence on resource extraction. The episode should be taken as a sign of things to come in a world where Russia’s main customers are going green.

By: Niclas Poitiers and Marta Domínguez-Jiménez Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: March 19, 2020
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