Download publication

External Publication

The Value of Money, Controversial Economic Cultures in Europe: Italy and Germany

A discussion of Italian and German macro-economic cultures and performances.

By: Date: June 10, 2021 Topic: Macroeconomic policy

The full book is available at Villa Vigoni.

Villa Vigoni Editore | Verlag has published the volume “The Value of Money. Controversial Economic Cultures in Europe: Italy and Germany”, edited by Christiane Liermann Traniello (General Secretary, Villa Vigoni), Thomas Mayer (Founding Director, Flossbach von Storch Research Institute), Francesco Papadia (Fellow, Bruegel; Chair of the Selection Panel of the Hellenic Financial Stability Fund and Chair of Prime Collateralised Securities) and Matteo Scotto (Research Fellow, Villa Vigoni), with a preface by Jean-Claude Trichet (President of European Central Bank between 2003 and 2011).

Thanks to the collaboration with renowned economists and policymakers, the publication compares Italian and German macro-economic cultures and performances. When the Bretton Woods system crumbled and currencies lost their direct link to the dollar and their indirect link to gold, these two countries embarked upon strongly different monetary policies. This divergence was reflected in the evolution of the exchange rates: the value of one D-Mark increased from 170 Italian lira under Bretton Woods to 990 Italian lira at the start of European Monetary Union: an astounding devaluation of about 85 per cent for the lira! Firstly, the volume describes the German and the Italian economic and, specifically, monetary models, with major attention paid to institutions such as Deutsche Bundesbank and Banca d’Italia, analysing their development in a diachronic perspective. Secondly, these paradigms are contextualized within a broader European context, which is fundamental to reflect upon possible future scenarios. As underlined by Jean-Claude Trichet in his Preface, [the book] permits to understand better the unique historic euro monetary endeavour for three reasons. First, it integrates the multiple angles of vision on monetary union offered by eminent academics and remarkable personalities having been active in making it. Second, it explores with great pertinence the layers of the historic project, whether monetary, economic, cultural or political. Last, but not least, in organizing a dialogue between Germany and Italy, it explores two major components in the fabric of the Euro area.

The key takeaway from the book suggests that crossing “the Alpine divide”, a formula summing up the discrepancies between Italian and German macroeconomic approaches and often the product of misunderstandings within the European Union, is a complex process, yet feasible, if not even an integral part of future European unity.

List of contributors: Pierluigi Ciocca, Lorenzo Codogno, Fabio Colasanti, Federico Fubini, Daniel Gros, Otmar Issing, Harold James, Hans-Helmut Kotz, Ivo Maes, Klaus Masuch, Thomas Mayer, Stefano Micossi, Pier Carlo Padoan, Francesco Papadia, Lucio Pench, Tobias Piller, André Sapir, Gunther Schnabl, Ludger Schuknecht, Sabine Seeger, Giulio Tremonti, Gertrude Tumpel-Gugerell.

You can also watch the presentation the presentation of the book by the authors at our event earlier this year.

Read about event More on this topic
 

Upcoming Event

Feb
17
09:00

A debate on fiscal rules and the new monetary strategy

Presentation of the Yearbook of the Euro 2022.

Speakers: Maria Demertzis, Fernando Fernández, Gonzalo García Andrés, José Carlos García de Quevedo, Pablo Hernández de Cos and Jorge Yzaguirre Topic: European governance
Read article More by this author
 

Opinion

European governance

The euro comes of age

A well-functioning euro reflects a degree of unity that allows the EU to credibly claim a position at the global table and therefore help shape the policies that will deal with global problems. That is a decisive success.

By: Maria Demertzis Topic: European governance, Macroeconomic policy Date: January 13, 2022
Read article More by this author
 

Opinion

European governance

The Euro at 20

The euro’s advocates hoped that the single currency would deliver economic and financial integration, policy convergence, political amalgamation, and global influence. While these predictions were often wide of the mark, the euro has arguably proven to be a wise investment.

By: Jean Pisani-Ferry Topic: European governance, Macroeconomic policy Date: January 3, 2022
Read article
 

Blog Post

Inclusive growth

The triple constraint on artificial-intelligence advancement in Europe

Skills, data and financing shortcomings constrain artificial-intelligence innovation in Europe.

By: Mia Hoffmann and Laura Nurski Topic: Digital economy and innovation, Inclusive growth Date: December 6, 2021
Read article Download PDF More on this topic
 

Book/Special report

European governance

Instruments of a strategic foreign economic policy

Study for the German Federal Foreign Office produced by Bruegel, the Kiel Institute for the World Economy and DIW Berlin.

By: Katrin Kamin, Kerstin Bernoth, Jacqueline Dombrowski, Gabriel Felbermayr, Marcel Fratzscher, Mia Hoffmann, Sebastian Horn, Karsten Neuhoff, Niclas Poitiers, Malte Rieth, Alexander Sandkamp, Pauline Weil, Guntram B. Wolff and Georg Zachmann Topic: European governance Date: November 12, 2021
Read about event More on this topic
 

Past Event

Past Event

European monetary policy: lessons from the past two decades

This event will feature the presentation of “Monetary Policy in Times of Crisis – A Tale of Two Decades of the European Central Bank."

Speakers: Petra Geraats, Wolfgang Lemke, Francesco Papadia and Massimo Rostagno Topic: Macroeconomic policy Date: November 4, 2021
Read article
 

Blog Post

European governanceInclusive growth

The socioeconomic effects of COVID-19 on women

The pandemic has disproportionately affected women both professionally and at home. Although the gender gap in labour force participation since the onset of the pandemic hasn't worsened, policy still needs to tackle existing gender gaps, which for some EU countries are very substantive.

By: Maria Demertzis and Mia Hoffmann Topic: European governance, Inclusive growth Date: November 3, 2021
Read article More on this topic
 

Blog Post

Strong, balanced, sustainable and inclusive growth? The G20 and the pandemic

The G20 is not doing enough to support strong, balanced, sustainable and inclusive growth in the wake of COVID-19, with the poorest countries left behind by the recovery.

By: Suman Bery and Pauline Weil Topic: Global economy and trade Date: October 29, 2021
Read article Download PDF
 

Parliamentary Testimony

European ParliamentInclusive growth

Understanding the socioeconomic effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on women

Testimony before the European Parliament's Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs (ECON) on the consequences of the pandemic on women.

By: Maria Demertzis and Mia Hoffmann Topic: European Parliament, Inclusive growth, Macroeconomic policy Date: October 27, 2021
Read article
 

Blog Post

European governance

Germany’s post-pandemic current account surplus

The pandemic has increased the net lending position of the German corporate sector. By incentivising private investment, policymakers could trigger a virtuous cycle of increasing wages, decreasing corporate net lending, which would eventually lead to a reduction of the economy-wide current account surplus.

By: Lionel Guetta-Jeanrenaud and Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European governance, Macroeconomic policy Date: October 21, 2021
Read article More by this author
 

Blog Post

Inclusive growth

Making antitrust work for, not against, gig workers and the self-employed

Policymakers should act to deal with labour-market concentration trends that potentially harm workers, especially gig workers and the self-employed.

By: Georgios Petropoulos Topic: Digital economy and innovation, Inclusive growth Date: October 11, 2021
Read article More by this author
 

Podcast

Podcast

Is tech redefining the workplace for women?

Laura Nurski, Sabine Theresia Köszegi and Giuseppe Porcaro explore the relationship between artificial intelligence and job transformation and ask whether the impact differs by gender.

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: Digital economy and innovation, Inclusive growth Date: October 6, 2021
Load more posts