Podcast

Mythbusters: debunking economic myths

Economics seems to be full of myths that are hard to debunk. Will robots take our jobs? Are trade deficits bad? Is China such a big economy simply because of the size of its population? This week, Nicholas Barrett, Maria Demertzis, Marta Domínguez-Jímenez and Niclas Poitiers put on the detective cap and become Bruegel's own economic mythbusters.

By: Date: April 3, 2020 Topic: Global Economics & Governance

Disclaimer: this podcast was recorded on the 3rd of March 2020, before the COVID-19 lockdown was put in place in the majority of Europe and the US. Hence, some parts of it are no longer applicable.

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Podcast

Podcast

REOPENING EUROPE - Reopening Common Good?

What should be the ground rules to support more sustainable business in a post-pandemic world?

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: August 12, 2020
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Opinion

Coronavirus recovery: invest rainy day savings to boost Hong Kong’s economy

The Hong Kong government might want to consider diversifying its economy by using part of the savings earmarked for rainy days. Beyond cushioning the negative impact of Covid-19 on SMEs and households, it is one more reason to spend.

By: Alicia García-Herrero Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: August 6, 2020
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Podcast

Podcast

REOPENING EUROPE - Reopening Tourism?

In this episode we unpack some reflections about tourism we have collected during the Reopening Europe journey.

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: August 5, 2020
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Podcast

Podcast

REOPENING EUROPE - Reopening Borders?

In June 2020, as Europe reopened after lockdown, we crossed ten national borders. We listened to diverse citizens, from passers-by to politicians, business people to artists, recording, documenting, and publishing stories.

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: July 29, 2020
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Opinion

China Has an Unfair Advantage in the EU Market. What Can Be Done to Level the Playing Field?

This article has originally been published in Brink News. The dominance of Chinese state-owned enterprises in China’s domestic market is giving them unfair advantages in the European Union single market as well. The EU Commission recently released a series of recommendations for leveling the playing field regarding foreign subsidies. Unfortunately, while useful, these ideas are unlikely to […]

By: Alicia García-Herrero and Guntram B. Wolff Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: July 28, 2020
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Podcast

Podcast

REOPENING EUROPE - Reopening Governance?

This is a summer feature of the Sound of Economics in cooperation with the Reopening Europe project.

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: July 23, 2020
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Blog Post

China's targeted corporate shopping spree to continue, especially in Europe

Expect small, below the radar deals to continue to flourish and, by the same token, Europe to lose part of its edge in industrial technology and other strategic sectors.

By: Alicia García-Herrero and Jianwei Xu Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: July 17, 2020
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Podcast

Podcast

The benefits of the single market - the case of last enlargement

As the Brexit negotiations are entering their final straight line, the question of trade agreements is heating up. Economists talk about the “cost of non Europe”. How much each country has gained from belonging to the EU’s single market? How much would it have missed out on if it didn’t belong to the single market? […]

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance, Global Economics & Governance Date: July 15, 2020
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Blog Post

Debt relief for Sub-Saharan Africa: what now?

When G20 finance heads meet on 18 July, Europe will again need to lead on the group’s flagship COVID-19 initiative to postpone low-income countries’ debt service payments. For the first time, China has agreed to participate as an official creditor alongside members of the Paris Club. However, continuing lack of clarity on which Chinese creditors will participate, coupled with resistance from private sector creditors to voluntary participation, suggest that actual relief will be much less than originally planned.

By: Suman Bery, Sybrand Brekelmans and Alicia García-Herrero Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: July 14, 2020
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Podcast

Podcast

Apps without borders? How COVID-19 apps show the limits of the EU digital single market

In their toolkit against a pandemic that knows no borders, several EU countries have bet on new technology from our era of globalisation: digital contact tracing COVID-19 apps. But the way they've been rolled out illustrate troublesome limits to the EU digital single market.

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: July 9, 2020
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Podcast

Podcast

Financial fragility after #COVID19

Before the pandemic hit, a substantial share of households reported that they would be unable to handle a financial emergency. In some EU countries, many had savings equivalent to just a few weeks of basic consumption.

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: July 2, 2020
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Blog Post

Europe’s China problem: investment screening and state aid

China’s state capitalist economy poses a challenge to EU openness to foreign investment. In response, the European Commission 17 June published a White Paper on “levelling the playing field with regard to state aid”, contemplating sensible and balanced policies to protect the integrity of the European single market from subsidised foreign acquisitions. However, against the backdrop of collapsing global capital flows and limited existing FDI from China, there is little risk of excessive exposure, indeed a deepening of bilateral investment flows would be beneficial for both economies.

By: Marta Domínguez-Jiménez and Niclas Poitiers Topic: Global Economics & Governance Date: July 2, 2020
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