Download publication

Policy Contribution

How good is the European Commission’s Just Transition Fund proposal?

On 14 January 2020, the European Commission published its proposal for a Just Transition Mechanism, intended to provide support to territories facing serious socioeconomic challenges related to the transition towards climate neutrality. This brief provides an overview and a critical assessment of the first pillar of this Mechanism, the Just Transition Fund (JTF).

By: , , and Date: February 26, 2020 Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance

This Policy Contribution was prepared for the European Parliament’s Committee on Regional Development (REGI) as an input to a REGI workshop on the Just Transition Fund on 19 February 2020. The original paper is available on the European Parliament’s webpage (here). Copyright remains with the European Parliament at all times.

  • The JTF is supposed to rely on €7.5 billion of ‘fresh money’ from the EU budget, to be complemented by funds from member states’ European Social Fund Plus (ESF+) and European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) envelopes, and by co-financing at the national level. All member states are eligible for the JTF, following the approval of their Territorial Just Transition Plans by the Commission. Funds are pre-allocated on a national level. Projects eligible for financing currently include projects aimed at economic revitalisation, social support and land restoration.
  • Given its small size, the JTF will not realistically be able to tackle effectively all three priorities. That is why we believe that it should fundamentally be amended to maximise its impact: funds should be allocated on a project basis (similar to the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund) rather than sprinkled all across Europe on a geographical basis.
  • To be sure that the JTF fulfils its objective on mitigating the social and economic costs of the transition to a climate-neutral economy, we also recommend the following amendments to the regulation:
    − Restrict eligible activities to social support and, to a lesser extent, land restoration;
    − Under social support, upskilling and reskilling policies should be combined with efforts to collect, harmonise and disseminate regional labour data; pension-bridging grants and mobility grants could also be added to the list of eligible activities;
    − Eligibility for land restoration support should be restricted to sites where a company is no longer able to pay for restoration itself, to respect the polluter-pays principle;
    − Use NUTS3-level data in the allocation formula rather than NUTS2-level data, to ensure that all territories in need of help are counted in the JTF allocation fomula;
    − Remove the mandatory transfer of ERDF funds into the JTF envelope and instead require member states to devote a portion of ERDF funds to the economic revitalisation of regions affected by the transition and identified by JTF allocation criteria, as a complement to the social support provided by the JTF.
Read article More on this topic More by this author
 

Podcast

Podcast

Keeping momentum on good governance

Transparency, human rights and good governance: a conversation with Katalin Cseh MEP

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: March 17, 2021
Read article Download PDF More on this topic More by this author
 

External Publication

When and how to unwind COVID support measures to the banking system?

Study of regulatory measures and supervisory practices that have supported public guarantee schemes and moratoria in euro-area countries prepared for the ECON committee of the European Parliament.

By: Alexander Lehmann Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: March 9, 2021
Read article Download PDF
 

External Publication

European Parliament

The impact of COVID-19 on the Internal Market

Study assessing the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on the European Union's Internal Market and consumer protection prepared for the European Parliament.

By: J. Scott Marcus, Niclas Poitiers, Lionel Guetta-Jeanrenaud, Monika Grzegorczyk, Sophie Buckingham, Fernando Hortal Foronda, Norman Röhner and Jacques Pelkmans Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance, European Parliament, Testimonies Date: March 1, 2021
Read article More on this topic More by this author
 

Blog Post

The post-coronavirus fiscal policy questions Europe must answer

Europe’s policymakers will have to take a series of decisions in the months ahead, in order to reinstate, and possibly reform, the bloc’s fiscal rulebook.

By: Thomas Wieser Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: February 3, 2021
Read article
 

External Publication

European Parliament

Data flows, artificial intelligence and international trade: impacts and prospects for the value chains of the future

In-depth briefing and analysis on the issues of digital trade and the geopolitics of trade provided to the European Parliament.

By: Dennis Görlich, Michèle Finck, Georgios Petropoulos, Niclas Poitiers and André Sapir Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance, European Parliament Date: November 26, 2020
Read article Download PDF More on this topic
 

Parliamentary Testimony

European Parliament

Socio-economic effects of digital trade and artificial intelligence on EU industries including their value chains and EU imports and exports with major trade partners

Testimony before the European Parliament on the subject of digital trade.

By: Georgios Petropoulos and André Sapir Topic: European Parliament Date: November 16, 2020
Read article More on this topic More by this author
 

Blog Post

Next Generation EU payments across countries and years

How much cake does everyone actually get and at what speed? This blogpost estimates the yearly Next Generation EU (NGEU) payments to each EU country at current prices in euros and as a share of GNI.

By: Zsolt Darvas Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: November 12, 2020
Read article Download PDF More on this topic More by this author
 

Policy Contribution

European Union recovery funds: strings attached, but not tied up in knots

Ensuring effective recovery spending is a high-stakes challenge for the European Union, with the potential for derailment because of fuzzy objectives and overloaded procedures. The EU should work with member countries to identify limited policies that will maximise the impact of EU investment, while accounting for spillovers.

By: Jean Pisani-Ferry Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance Date: October 27, 2020
Read article More on this topic More by this author
 

Blog Post

The European climate law needs a strong just transition fund

To deliver on the goals of the European climate law, the European Union needs finally to get coal out of its energy mix: the EU should quicken the pace of decarbonisation whilst delivering on its goal of social inclusion.

By: Simone Tagliapietra Topic: Energy & Climate Date: October 6, 2020
Read article More by this author
 

Opinion

Europe’s recovery gamble

Next Generation EU, was rightly hailed as a major breakthrough: never before had the EU borrowed to finance expenditures, let alone transfers to member states. But the programme and its Recovery and Resilience Facility amount to a high-risk gamble.

By: Jean Pisani-Ferry Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance, Finance & Financial Regulation Date: September 25, 2020
Read article Download PDF
 

External Publication

How Can the European Parliament Better Oversee the European Central Bank?

This paper, written at the request of the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs, assesses how the European Parliament holds the European Central Bank accountable. The same exercise is done for the Bank of Japan, in order to identify possible lessons for the ECB and the European Parliament.

By: Grégory Claeys and Marta Domínguez-Jiménez Topic: European Macroeconomics & Governance, Global Economics & Governance Date: September 23, 2020
Read article More on this topic More by this author
 

Blog Post

Redefining European Union green bonds: from greening projects to greening policies

European Union green bonds, as promised by European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen, might be better linked to the bloc's achievement of its climate goals, rather than project-by-project green criteria.

By: Georg Zachmann Topic: Energy & Climate Date: September 21, 2020
Load more posts