Download publication

Policy Brief

Rethinking the European Union’s post-Brexit budget priorities

There will be a €94 billion Brexit-related hole in the EU budget for 2021-27 if business continues as before and the United Kingdom does not contribute. The authors show that freezing agriculture and cohesion spending in real terms would fill the hole, but new priorities would then need to be funded by an increase in the percent of GNI contribution.

By: and Date: March 19, 2018 Topic: Macroeconomic policy

This Policy Brief is a version of a paper written as a contribution to the Bulgarian EU Presidency conference on the Multiannual Financial Framework, Sofia, 9 March 2018. The authors are grateful to Yana Myachenkova, Nicolas Moës and David Pichler for excellent research assistance. This paper is accompanied by an annex  available here.

The issue

The European Union’s budget is fundamentally different from the budgets of federal countries and amounts to only about one percent of the EU’s gross national income. The literature shows that the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP), which takes 38 percent of EU spending, provides good income support, especially for richer farmers, but is less effective for greening and biodiversity and is unevenly distributed. Cohesion policy, 34 percent of EU spending, contributes to convergence but it is unclear how strong and long-lasting the effects are. Spending on new priorities such as border control could require additional funds of at least €100 billion for the 2021-27 period. In addition, EU budgeting is based on a complex and outdated methodology.

Policy challenge

There will be a €94 billion Brexit-related hole in the EU budget for 2021-27 if business continues as before and the United Kingdom does not contribute. EU countries might be reluctant to increase contributions to fill this hole while also covering spending on new priorities. We show that freezing agriculture and cohesion spending in real terms would fill the Brexit-related hole, but new priorities would then need to be funded by an increase in the percent of GNI contribution. Freezing in nominal terms – thus cutting in real terms – would generate enough to cover most of the new priorities. This would be topped-up by a UK contribution if a EU – UK deal is reached. A fundamental overhaul of the EU budget, including its methodology, is crucial.

The reference to the work of Lars Hoelgaard (2018) has been corrected on 20 March 2018.

 

 

Read about event More on this topic
 

Upcoming Event

Dec
3
11:30

Inside the European crises: a conversation with Marco Buti

At this event Marco Buti talks to Bruegel's Director Guntram Wolff about his new book, in which he gives an insiders look at European policy making.

Speakers: Marco Buti and Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European governance
Read article More on this topic More by this author
 

Podcast

Podcast

Pandemonium

How did Europe respond to the pandemic?

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: European governance Date: November 17, 2021
Read article Download PDF More on this topic
 

Book/Special report

European governance

Instruments of a strategic foreign economic policy

Study for the German Federal Foreign Office produced by Bruegel, the Kiel Institute for the World Economy and DIW Berlin.

By: Katrin Kamin, Kerstin Bernoth, Jacqueline Dombrowski, Gabriel Felbermayr, Marcel Fratzscher, Mia Hoffmann, Sebastian Horn, Karsten Neuhoff, Niclas Poitiers, Malte Rieth, Alexander Sandkamp, Pauline Weil, Guntram B. Wolff and Georg Zachmann Topic: European governance Date: November 12, 2021
Read article Download PDF More by this author
 

Parliamentary Testimony

European governanceFrench Senate

European Union countries’ National Recovery and Resilience Plans: A cross-country comparison

Testimony before the Economic Affairs Committee of the French Senate.

By: Simone Tagliapietra Topic: European governance, French Senate, Macroeconomic policy Date: November 12, 2021
Read article Download PDF
 

Policy Contribution

European governance

Next Generation EU borrowing: a first assessment

The Next Generation EU programme is radically changing the way the EU finances itself and interacts with financial markets. This paper assesses the first design decisions made by the European Commission and the issuances that have taken place so far. It also outlines the potential risks and opportunities linked to this upgrading of the EU borrowing.

By: Rebecca Christie, Grégory Claeys and Pauline Weil Topic: Banking and capital markets, European governance, Macroeconomic policy Date: November 10, 2021
Read about event More on this topic
 

Past Event

Past Event

Phasing out COVID-19 emergency support programmes: effects on productivity and financial stability

How can European countries phase out the COVID-19 support measures without having a negative impact on productivity and financial stability?

Speakers: Eric Bartelsman, Maria Demertzis, Peter Grasmann and Laurie Mayers Topic: Macroeconomic policy Date: November 9, 2021
Read article Download PDF
 

Policy Contribution

European governance

COVID-19 financial aid and productivity: has support been well spent?

While support schemes during the pandemic were not targeted at protecting ‘good’ firms, financial support mostly went to those with the capacity to survive and succeed. Labour schemes have been effective in protecting employment.

By: Carlo Altomonte, Maria Demertzis, Lionel Fontagné and Steffen Müller Topic: European governance, Macroeconomic policy Date: November 4, 2021
Read article Download PDF More by this author
 

Parliamentary Testimony

European governanceEuropean Parliament

An overview of the Recovery and Resilience Plans

Testimony before the European Parliament’s Committee for Budgetary Control (CONT) on the topic "Capacity for proper expenditure controls of the increased budget of the MFF and NGEU".

By: Zsolt Darvas Topic: European governance, European Parliament, Macroeconomic policy, Testimonies Date: November 2, 2021
Read article More by this author
 

Opinion

European governance

Can EU fiscal rules jump on the green bandwagon?

By and large, setting a new green golden rule would be a useful addition to the existing EU fiscal framework.

By: Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European governance, Green economy, Macroeconomic policy Date: October 22, 2021
Read article More by this author
 

Opinion

European governance

The inconsistency in global strategic relations

All of this talk on strategic retrenchment and autonomy is the language of escalation, not of appeasement and collaboration.

By: Maria Demertzis Topic: European governance, Global economy and trade Date: October 13, 2021
Read article More by this author
 

Blog Post

European governance

Pandemic prevention: avoiding another cycle of ‘panic and neglect’

Agreement is needed at international level on mechanisms to ensure better preparedness for the next pandemic.

By: Anne Bucher Topic: European governance, Global economy and trade Date: October 7, 2021
Read article More by this author
 

Podcast

Podcast

A green fiscal pact

How can the European Union increase green public investment while consolidating budget deficits?

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: European governance, Macroeconomic policy Date: September 29, 2021
Load more posts