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Book/Special report

EU–China Economic Relations to 2025. Building a Common Future

The EU and China, as the world’s second and third largest economies, share a responsibility in upholding the rules-based, global free trade system and other forms of multilateral cooperation, especially on combating climate change. This report sets out the main conclusions of a research project between European and Chinese think-tanks, which addresses the prospects for the EU–China economic relationship. A Joint Report by Bruegel, Chatham House, the China Center for International Economic Exchanges and the Institute of Global Economics and Finance at The Chinese University of Hong Kong.

By: , , , and Date: September 13, 2017 Topic: Global economy and trade

With global uncertainties on the rise, it has become particularly important for the EU and China to find ways to deepen their bilateral economic cooperation.

The EU and China, as the world’s second and third largest economies, share a responsibility in upholding the rules-based, global free trade system and other forms of multilateral cooperation, especially on combating climate change. Starting from this premise, this report sets out the main conclusions of a research project between European and Chinese think-tanks, which addresses the prospects for the EU–China economic relationship through to 2025.

As the report lays out, the two sides have the opportunity to deepen their cooperation in areas such as trade and investment; infrastructure; energy, the environment and the Paris climate change agreement; science, technology, innovation and industrial cooperation; financial services; people-to-people exchanges; and global governance. In this way, the EU and China can help ensure that global development is stable, strong, balanced and sustainable. The report also discusses the numerous obstacles that stand in between further collaboration.

 

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Opinion

In the electric vehicle race, China coming first

China is not only a producer and consumer of EVs, but also of the battery components on which they depend.

By: Alicia García-Herrero Topic: Green economy Date: January 26, 2022
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Opinion

How Chinese competition helps western conglomerates

Firms like GE and Siemens may well find that their decision to split their businesses into multiple companies leads to increased profits and higher stock prices. But recent research indicates that this is not the only way conglomerates can boost efficiency.

By: Dalia Marin Topic: Global economy and trade Date: January 17, 2022
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Podcast

Podcast

Understanding Japan’s economic relations with China

What can Europe learn?

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: Global economy and trade Date: January 12, 2022
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Podcast

Podcast

The European economy in 2022

What are the economic priorities for the new year?

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: European governance, Macroeconomic policy Date: January 5, 2022
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Blog Post

European governanceInclusive growth

12 Charts for 21

A selection of charts from Bruegel’s weekly newsletter, analysis of the year and what it meant for the economy in Europe and the world.

By: Hèctor Badenes, Henry Naylor, Giuseppe Porcaro and Yuyun Zhan Topic: Banking and capital markets, Digital economy and innovation, European governance, Global economy and trade, Green economy, Inclusive growth, Macroeconomic policy Date: December 21, 2021
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Podcast

Podcast

What to watch in 2022: China's economic outlook

Our end of 2021 recap of China’s economic activities.

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: Global economy and trade Date: December 8, 2021
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Blog Post

European governance

The Global Gateway: a real step towards a stronger Europe in the world?

Disappointment at the lack of fresh cash from European Union global connectivity strategy is short-sighted: Europe supports global development more than any other country in the world. Using existing funds more strategically is the right priority for now.

By: Simone Tagliapietra Topic: European governance, Global economy and trade Date: December 7, 2021
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External Publication

Chinese economic statecraft: what to expect in the next five years?

Chapter from 'Storms Ahead: the Future Geoeconomic world order' on the expectations from the next five years of Chinese economic policy, published on 27 October 2021.

By: Alicia García-Herrero Topic: Global economy and trade Date: November 26, 2021
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Blog Post

Goodbye Glasgow: what’s next for global climate action?

After COP26, and as the debate on whether Glasgow represents a success or a failure dies down, what next for global climate action?

By: Klaas Lenaerts and Simone Tagliapietra Topic: Green economy Date: November 18, 2021
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Podcast

Podcast

Why is China cracking down on big tech?

A look at China’s recent regulatory efforts in the digital space.

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: Global economy and trade Date: November 10, 2021
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Past Event

Past Event

Microchips and Europe's strategic autonomy

Per microchips ad strategic autonomy.

Speakers: Piotr Arak, Alicia García-Herrero, Jay Lewis, Stefan Mengel and Niclas Poitiers Topic: Digital economy and innovation, European governance Date: November 2, 2021
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Opinion

COP26: why carbon pricing is crucial to China’s climate change pledges

China’s emissions trading scheme is a welcome but to reach its full potential, it needs to cover more of China’s emissions, go beyond the electricity sector and let prices reflect the true cost of carbon.

By: Alicia García-Herrero and Junyu Tan Topic: Global economy and trade, Green economy Date: October 22, 2021
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