Blog Post

Economic and legal observations on capital controls

While the exact decision of the Greek government is not yet to my knowledge clearly communicated, it appears that besides a bank holiday, the government intends to impose capital controls. The Guardian reports that for capital control measures to take effect, the Greek cabinet must approve the recommendations of the Greek financial stability council  and a presidential decree is needed.

By: Date: June 28, 2015 Topic: Macroeconomic policy

While the exact decision of the Greek government is not yet to my knowledge clearly communicated, it appears that besides a bank holiday, the government intends to impose capital controls. The Guardian reports that for capital control measures to take effect, the Greek cabinet must approve the recommendations of the Greek financial stability council  and a presidential decree is needed.

Legally, capital controls are relatively difficult to justify in EU law. However Article 65(1b) TFEU provides a loophole in the EU treaties. The free movement of capital in the European Union is a fundamental principle codified in the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU); see Article 63(1). While the TFEU allows countries outside the euro area to “take the necessary protective measures” when a sudden balance of payments crisis occurs (Article 144(1)), euro-area countries do not have such a right. Article 65(1b) acknowledges the right of all EU Member States to “take measures which are justified on grounds of public policy or public security”. In addition, Article 65(3) states that such measures “shall not constitute a means of arbitrary discrimination or a disguised restriction on the free movement of capital and payments as defined in Article 63.”

Economically, as I have argued in the case of Cyprus, capital controls are a contradiction in terms to monetary union. A euro is a euro only if it can circulate freely in the entire monetary union. With capital controls, the Greek euro will be worth less than the French or German euro and therefore ceases to be a euro.

The statement by Greek PM Tsipras that Greek deposits are safe is therefore wrong. Their value is already now significantly lower than their face value.

The good news, however, is that capital controls can be reversed. For capital controls to be reversed and Greece to remain in the euro, a necessary condition is that the ECB is ready to provide abundant liquidity to all solvent banks. This is unlikely to happen without prior political agreement in euro group. Like it or not: The limits of monetary union are the limits of political union.


Republishing and referencing

Bruegel considers itself a public good and takes no institutional standpoint. Anyone is free to republish and/or quote this post without prior consent. Please provide a full reference, clearly stating Bruegel and the relevant author as the source, and include a prominent hyperlink to the original post.

Read article More by this author
 

Opinion

European governance

The euro comes of age

A well-functioning euro reflects a degree of unity that allows the EU to credibly claim a position at the global table and therefore help shape the policies that will deal with global problems. That is a decisive success.

By: Maria Demertzis Topic: European governance, Macroeconomic policy Date: January 13, 2022
Read article More by this author
 

Podcast

Podcast

The European economy in 2022

What are the economic priorities for the new year?

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: European governance, Macroeconomic policy Date: January 5, 2022
Read article More by this author
 

Opinion

European governance

The Euro at 20

The euro’s advocates hoped that the single currency would deliver economic and financial integration, policy convergence, political amalgamation, and global influence. While these predictions were often wide of the mark, the euro has arguably proven to be a wise investment.

By: Jean Pisani-Ferry Topic: European governance, Macroeconomic policy Date: January 3, 2022
Read article
 

Blog Post

European governance

Policy coordination failures in the euro area: not just an outcome, but by design

Discussions on the fiscal framework should aim to correct its procyclical nature with a view to promoting more cooperative outcomes.

By: Maria Demertzis and Nicola Viegi Topic: European governance, Macroeconomic policy Date: December 20, 2021
Read article More on this topic More by this author
 

Opinion

Inflation ideology: camp permanent or camp temporary?

Policy focus should be on tackling uncertainties by being able to tackle as many scenarios as possible.

By: Maria Demertzis Topic: Macroeconomic policy Date: December 9, 2021
Read article More by this author
 

Blog Post

Fiscal arithmetic and risk of sovereign insolvency

The record-high debt levels in advanced economies increase the risk of sovereign insolvency. Governments should start fiscal consolidation soon in an environment of low nominal and real interest rates and post-COVID growth.

By: Marek Dabrowski Topic: Global economy and trade, Macroeconomic policy Date: November 18, 2021
Read about event More on this topic
 

Past Event

Past Event

European monetary policy: lessons from the past two decades

This event will feature the presentation of “Monetary Policy in Times of Crisis – A Tale of Two Decades of the European Central Bank."

Speakers: Petra Geraats, Wolfgang Lemke, Francesco Papadia and Massimo Rostagno Topic: Macroeconomic policy Date: November 4, 2021
Read about event
 

Past Event

Past Event

Microchips and Europe's strategic autonomy

Per microchips ad strategic autonomy.

Speakers: Piotr Arak, Alicia García-Herrero, Jay Lewis, Stefan Mengel and Niclas Poitiers Topic: Digital economy and innovation, European governance Date: November 2, 2021
Read article
 

Blog Post

European governance

Germany’s post-pandemic current account surplus

The pandemic has increased the net lending position of the German corporate sector. By incentivising private investment, policymakers could trigger a virtuous cycle of increasing wages, decreasing corporate net lending, which would eventually lead to a reduction of the economy-wide current account surplus.

By: Lionel Guetta-Jeanrenaud and Guntram B. Wolff Topic: European governance, Macroeconomic policy Date: October 21, 2021
Read article
 

External Publication

European Parliament

Tailoring prudential policy to bank size: the application of proportionality in the US and euro area

In-depth analysis prepared for the European Parliament's Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs (ECON).

By: Alexander Lehmann and Nicolas Véron Topic: Banking and capital markets, European Parliament, Macroeconomic policy Date: October 14, 2021
Read article More on this topic More by this author
 

Podcast

Podcast

Unboxing the State of the Union 2021

In this Sound of Economics Live episode, Bruegel experts look at the State of the Union address delivered by Ursula von der Leyen, President of the European Commission.

By: The Sound of Economics Topic: Macroeconomic policy Date: September 15, 2021
Read about event More on this topic
 

Past Event

Past Event

The Sound of Economics Live: Unboxing the State of the Union 2021

In this Sound of Economics Live episode, we look at the State of the Union address delivered by Ursula von der Leyen, President of the European Commission.

Speakers: Grégory Claeys, Maria Demertzis, Alicia García-Herrero and Giuseppe Porcaro Topic: Macroeconomic policy Location: Bruegel, Rue de la Charité 33, 1210 Brussels Date: September 15, 2021
Load more posts